What Happens When A Skinny Person Gets Fat

No one ever said the world was fair.

  • Some of us can eat and drink whatever we want…and never gain a pound of body-fat.

Victorias Secret vs Dove women What Happens When A Skinny Person Gets Fat

  • While some of us eat healthy, eat small portions, exercise religiously…and still have to shop for Plus Size clothes.

NOT FAIR….especially in a society which:

  • Rewards women (and men) who are lean, fit and have no need to squeeze into a pair of Spanx.
  • Punishes obese women (and men) with lower pay, bad jokes and outright hostility by a growing army of douche-bags.

So, what happens when the world goes all Freaky Friday and a 39 year old woman who is naturally tall…naturally lean…while being naturally addicted to potato chips & pizza…suddenly gains 30 pounds in less than 3 months…without changing her diet or level of physical activity?

  1. Does she freak out and start snorting diet pills?
  2. Does she go into denial and pretend that she still fits into her uber-skinny “skinny jeans”?
  3. Does she morph into a rabid Fat Acceptance advocate denying that obesity is a symptom of less-than-optimum health?
  4. Or does she step back, look critically at the situation and start looking for causes, cures and support?

Here’s what happened

About two weeks ago, I got a call from Ms. Skinny/Fat to discuss her recent & unexpected weight gain.

She told me that how, after a brief period of denial (#2), she had become concerned that this weight gain might be an indicator of a hormonal imbalance or some other health issue…and that she had better do something about it (#4). She had already booked an appointment with her family doctor, but since she is friends with one of the world’s greatest weight loss experts (moi), she decided to solicit my opinion.

Over a cup of coffee with her and her husband, we discussed the past six months of her life…what she ate, when she ate it, her work life, her home life, her medical history, her stress levels, her husband, her plans for the next six months, etc…

We looked into every nook and cranny of her physical, emotional, intellectual, social and spiritual aspect of her life…trying to find clues for why her body decided to stop being skinny and start being pudgy.

What we found was that a teeny-tiny dose of mirtazapine (1/4th of the normal starting dose – prescribed for anxiety) was most likely the culprit to have caused a significant shift in her appetite, metabolism, insulin sensitivity, leptin sensitivity and ultimately caused this naturally skinny person to get fat

After a quick consultation with her doctor, Ms. Skinny/Fat made 4 immediate changes to her daily routine:

  1. She started bleeding herself off of the mirtazapine
  2. She started taking a new prescription for anxiety
  3. She started a CBT/Mindfulness Mediatation program for anxiety
  4. She removed ALL starchy carbs from her diet in an attempt to compensate for any potential insulin/leptin sensitivty problems

The Result?

  • Her appetite dropped immediately
  • Her weight gain stopped immediately
  • After one week, weight loss has begun

The Moral(s) of the Story?

  1. It doesn’t take much for a naturally skinny person to get booted out of their excluisive little club. A slight shift in hormones or brain chemicals can have a drastic effect upon body composition.
  2. If you are the type of skinny person who thinks that fatties are fat because they are lazy and without self-control, you may want to put down your prejudices and give your brain a shake.
  3. Obesity IS a symptom of something going on in your body. A perfectly healthy body is NOT obese. Whether the cause of your obesity is easy to find and/or easy to correct is another question altogether. In this case, it was pretty easy to find and seems to be on its way to being corrected.
  4. If you are the type of obese person who blames their metabolism for their obesity, you might be correct in the diagnosis, but you are 100% wrong if you think the situation is hopeless. Obesity isn’t a curse. It’s a symptom of imbalance. Discover the imbalance and try to correct it.

Reference

 

Doug Robb is a personal trainer, a fitness blogger and author, a competitive athlete, a social media nerd and a student of nutrition and exercise science. Since 2008, Doug has brought his real-world experience online via his health & fitness blog, Health Habits.

4 Comments

  1. vpshunt

    November 1, 2013 at 12:25 am

    i like model of victoria seacret <3<3
    lol

  2. Ravan Asteris

    September 19, 2013 at 11:24 pm

    Yeah, but what about people who caught ‘teh fat’ at puberty? No prescription to change there, just abusive diets that made the problem worse. Stabilizing the problem meant accepting that diets are death. It would be real nice if they could find the metabolic triggers for stuff and ways to fix them, but until then, fat acceptance and a healthy, balanced diet keep me stable.

    • Douglas Robb

      September 20, 2013 at 6:44 am

      Agreed…no prescription to change. And this is one reason why I find women are more aware of the powerful effect that hormones can have upon our bodies. Guys are a harder sell.

      I agree that the idea of inflicting calorie-reduced diets on young girls at a time of major hormonal flux is a bad, bad, bad idea. It would be nice if instead of young girls being told that they need to be thin, they were told that they need to be healthy. Imagine if advertisers, celebrities, parents, schools, etc all promoted a message of health…if it was cool to be healthy and strong and smart…instead of skinny and knowing how to twerk

  3. dagnykight

    September 19, 2013 at 1:35 pm

    Whoa I’m a little scared of you because around the same time you must have been writing this, I was working on a blog post titled “When Average Weight People are Faced with Weight Gain.” Seriously. I haven’t finished it.

    You make the primary point of my weight advocacy work—there are SO MANY factors that can contribute to weight gain and weight management. What exacerbates it all right now is the deep development of the most obesogenic culture of all time. It’s simply foolish and I think based in biased thinking to believe we can point to one conclusive “reason” which is usually to project blame and shame on overweight people.