Anti-Cancer Potato Chips

Over the past few years, a growing body of research indicates that acrilamyde (a substance produced when potatoes/corn et al are deep fried) can lead to heart disease, nervous system disorders and cancer.

house 300x282 Anti Cancer Potato ChipsIronically, this means that the bag of potato and/or nacho chips you ate last night while watching House might just lead to a situation where you require the services of a real-life Greg House.

Ain’t irony grand?

Luckily for us Canadians, our socialized health care system has sprang into action and has devised a plan to solve this whole acrilamyde kerfluffle.

And how are they going to do this?

  • By implementing a public health campaign to reduce the consumption of crunchy snack foods?
  • By taxing products high in acrilamyde?

Nope

  • Health Canada wants snack food manufacturers to put small amounts of the enzyme asparaginase into their products prior to the deep frying process.

What is Asparaginase?

Asparaginase is an enzyme that hydrolyses an amino acid, asparagine, to aspartic acid by hydrolyzing the amide in free asparagine to the corresponding acid, aspartic acid.

This is a good thing.

Reduced levels of asparagine means reduced levels of acrylamide means reduced chance of heart disease, nervous system disorders and cancer.

Currently, asparaginase is injected into leukemia patients as a treatment for their cancer.

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So this is what we’ve come to.

asparaginase chips 279x300 Anti Cancer Potato ChipsInstead of “not eating” foods that cause cancer, we choose to inject those foods with anti-cancer enzymes.

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It won’t be long before every bag of nachos comes with it’s own pre-loaded syringe of asparaginase.

But, before that happens, Canadian health regulations require that before a new food additive is allowed to be used in Canada, a submission must be filed with Health Canada so the Department can conduct a safety evaluation of the proposed use(s) of the additive. Food manufacturers are not permitted to use the additive until the safety assessment has been completed by Health Canada and the Regulations are amended to formally enable its use…. blah, blah, blah…

As part of the evaluation process, Health Canada is soliciting comments from the public.

So, for all my Canadian readers, I urge you to take the time to shoot Health Canada an email and let them know if you want asparaginase injected into your nacho chips.

But before you send that email, here are some…

Points to Consider

  • Deep fried Potato/Nacho chips have high levels of acrilyamide
  • Acrylamide is linked to heart disease and cancer
  • You don’t want heart disease or cancer
  • Acrylamide researcher Dr. Lorelei Mucci says that acrylamide levels can be reduced by cooking chips at lower temperatures or by first soaking the chips in water to extract some of the sugar. Unfortunately, these techniques can affect the plesant odor, crispness or color of the finished product
  • Acrylamide levels can be reduced to 0% by not eating potato/nacho chips
  • Potato/Nacho chips make you fat and give you pimples.
  • Cool kids don’t eat potato/nacho chips

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Doug Robb is a personal trainer, a fitness blogger and author, a competitive athlete, a social media nerd and a student of nutrition and exercise science. Since 2008, Doug has brought his real-world experience online via his health & fitness blog, Health Habits.

13 Comments

  1. imaginanter

    March 1, 2012 at 10:23 pm

    Hahahaha! So you screw with food to make it better…and end up making it WORSE?! Why not just apply common sense and cut down on the cr@p, eat better and eat less fried junk!

  2. Pingback: Carbohydrates and Chronic Kidney Disease

  3. Mary-Jo

    February 20, 2011 at 4:33 am

    BTW, I am a fast-but-fresh food fanatic and have some quick, easy, but absolutely delicious recipes posted on my blog. Some of them may fit into the Paleo or ‘revised-Paleo’, HH diet, but probably not. I often include whole-grain carbs in my recipes.

    • healthhabits

      February 22, 2011 at 8:14 am

      Thanks MJ

  4. Mary-Jo

    February 20, 2011 at 4:28 am

    Well, why stop there? Why not inject Twinkies with an anti-diabetes and obesity enzyme or Bacardi Breezers with anti-cirrhosis, fatty-liver antidotes? And why does it takes so long? We all want to be able to guzzle and gorge whatever we want without any risks of disease or other untoward effects, whatsoever. Right? Then, we’ll all be perfectly healthy.

    C’mon,food scientist geniuses who are paid good money by food companies and food regulatory experts?! Hurry up and get these anti-disease junk foods rolled out, yesterday! Otherwise, we’ll all STARVE to death!!!

  5. Cool Garden Things

    January 28, 2010 at 1:08 pm

    I don’t know what to say-we eat a lot of fried potatoes…ugh…great.
    GartenGrl

    • healthhabits

      January 28, 2010 at 1:17 pm

      sorry about that (I love potatoes too)

  6. laurie willberg

    December 26, 2009 at 5:08 pm

    Wouldn’t it be a better idea for Health Canada to focus on getting additives OUT of our food. Hint: MSG, hydrolyzed guck, high-fructose corn syrup, aspartame, etc. ALL of these have been linked to obesity and a lot of other health problems. Asparaginase is an anti-cancer drug? Yes. Lots of negative side-effects? Yes. Another cash cow for the pharmaceutical industry? Yes.
    Let’s eat fresh whole foods? Yes.

  7. sangita

    December 24, 2009 at 6:51 am

    Good God!! Unbelievable!

  8. sangita

    December 23, 2009 at 12:10 am

    If they put this asparaginase in the chips people will get an excuse to eat them even more than ever! I mean now that they are “healthy”. The sheer quantity of the chips consumed will outweight any benefits of the aspa….
    Surely the government realises that!

    • healthhabits

      December 23, 2009 at 5:30 am

      As if the only downside to eating a diet high in fried potatoes is the acrylamide.
      mcd

  9. Steve Parker, M.D.

    December 22, 2009 at 3:36 pm

    Ooh…I like that word – kerfuffle! Have to start using it more.

    [Kerfluffle is just as valid.]

    -Steve

    • healthhabits

      December 22, 2009 at 4:21 pm

      You don’t find that many occasions to use ferfuffle [kerfluffle] in a conversation, so when I do, I try to take advantage of it.